Tuesday, 5 August 2014

Adam Goodes - ensuring racism as a sport



We can all learn a lesson or two from Adam Goodes.  
 
What began as an insult thrown by a child during a football match has turned into an epic saga, drawing in and devouring plenty in its wake.  It didn’t need to be like this, but apparently over-reacting has spread like the common cold.

Goodes was the first to fall ill.  During a football match, he heard insults directed at him, one of which was ‘ape’.  Able to identify the culprit, he pointed her out and security removed the girl from her seat and gave her a lecture for a few hours.   The media seized, the family were shamed, branded and humiliated, and ignorant people everywhere patted themselves on the back that their vitriolic revenge was justified in the name of stamping out racism in this country. 

When it turned out that the young girl was a Collingwood supporter, Eddie was next to fall ill.  He was immediately outraged and disgusted, telling all who would listen that he and his club would not tolerate racism.  Sadly for Eddie, his ability to moderate a situation that was not yet at ‘code red’ down to a mere ‘whoops’ was either ravaged by the virus or unable to operate in tandem with any mention of race, and he was jumping on the bandwagon in full.  The girl was made a pariah, and Eddie was hailed a friend to black guys everywhere…until of course, he made the same fundamental human error that the 13 year old girl had made herself.  Suddenly, he was the pariah, and after coming out against ‘racism’ so strongly, he was left with nowhere to go and worse, he couldn’t claim to be underage OR unaware as an excuse for his ‘crime’. 

And just what was the crime?  To suggest that Adam Goodes might do well to get on board and promote a musical called ‘King Kong’.   In typical Eddie fashion, he saw a way to make a buck out of a drama.  Who else has done more to make apes famous than Adam Goodes in this country I ask you?  It’s what I would have suggested if Adam Goodes had asked me how to climb out of the hole he was fast digging for himself at that point.  Find the humour in the situation and show people that despite the controversy, you are not so invested in yourself that you can’t play any other role than the victim.  Save your outrage and hurt feelings for the times when you’ve really, truly been vilified, rather than when you’re called a name by a kid as a grown man.

Who knows, if you show other people you are capable of finding the humour in things, you might not end up feeling so hurt and victimised yourself.  That is a lonely life that only isolates you from others as your constant inability to forgive minor social transgressions will slowly but surely turn all but the most loyal from wanting to be a part of your life.  They’ll all screw up at some point, everyone does, and the ones you haven’t driven away by a one-man jury verdict of ‘racist’ will eventually flee when they tire of your constant need to pick apart their comments like a paranoid crack addict through garbage.

Was all the hysteria worth it?  

It was a 13 year old girl.  A child.  Someone who is entitled to privacy, and to the childhood right of making mistakes and behaving poorly at times without the entire country knowing their name, transgression, and labelling them as anything based on a few moments of their behaviour.   No name she called anybody justifies the treatment she received.  Those involved in the public shaming of this girl did not take a stand against racism, they frightened a child repeatedly, and made judgements about her family in public.  

For what it’s worth, I’ve been called an ape, a monkey (as well as the more outdoorsy themed ‘porch monkey’) and plenty of other insults that I could easily say were used as a ‘racial slur’ against me.  That does not stop me, however, from referring to myself these days - as I go through the aging process and attract more grey hairs - as ‘Silverback’.    I like monkeys, I’m a hairy bloke, and I should be free to use whatever nicknames I like for myself.  I tell my friends to do the same.  It doesn’t mean I’m ignorant of the  ‘historical context’ of hurt feelings of Aboriginal people over the years (the typical argument brought forth when you suggest ‘ape’ should not be a censored word), but that I’d rather use logic and reason instead of emotion when it comes to stuff like this.  Logic tells me that when I’ve been called a name, it’s almost always because someone wanted to take a cheap shot and was angry or frustrated or wanting to appear superior, or some other powerful emotion that tends to blur our logical thought processes.  Being that I’m easily identifiable as Aboriginal, the cheap shot will usually take the form of a racial slur.  For others, it might be based on their weight, hair colour, appearance, religion, skin colour – it seems as humans we find a million ways to see differences in one another and separate ourselves according to those, and it would seem there is nobody who is immune from this.    

As for Adam, well, in the end, I think he got what he really wanted.  Before the game, he spoke of Nicky Winmar and his now historic stand against racism.  As a man whose days are numbered at the top of his game, he really wants to be remembered like Nicky was.   He wants a legacy.  And as he inches closer to retirement from football, a job afterwards would be nice – perhaps the victim theatrics were just his way of auditioning for a job in the Industry.  Viewing his performance from that angle, I give him an A++.  They’re gonna  love  him.  As for me, I can’t look up to you Adam.  I’m ashamed of the way a child was used as a pawn to achieve your goal, and you should be too. 

75 comments:

  1. No grown man of any character could possibly endorse the way that 13 year old girl was terrorized by those in the grip of holier than thou fervor, even if you assume the worst of her actions that day. But then again, if that man viewed himself as a representative of a collective, and the young girl as merely a representative of an opposing collective (one which was, without exception, the victimizer to the group of victims he represented). Then the girl merely becomes a prop, so that a man can claim power in the name of a self-proclaimed virtue. No one individual could treat another individual that way and call themselves moral. But one who viewed themselves as different, and entitled to act out in a way totally at odds with morality, because they believe they represent all wrongs visited upon their ethnicity (despite all the wealth and success they have amassed personally) certainly could. And in doing so would demand that everyone see him not as a man, an individual to be weighed as any other, but as merely a skin color, something wholly bereft of individuality. The irony that this same argument has been used by White Supremacists since inception was probably lost on him though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. on the very same day, i played against a guy who introduced himself as "Nigger". thats what his team mates called him too.

      Delete
  2. This is a simply brilliant article which articulates everything I felt about the issue. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  3. A brilliant article. Such a shame you are not writing for the mainstream media as you not only hit the nail on the head but you have a great way with words.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Brilliant thinking , funny, warm and an accurate account of contemporary foibles.
    Site to be bookmarked.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well said Mr Steam Train. I don't care what colour someone's skin is. If Goodes wants to style himself to look like an ape then children will be children. I can't help casting my mind back to 1968 and the first 'planet of the apes' every time I see him. It's just what he looks like. Have you noticed the latest men's fashion look is something akin to 'Chewbacca' from Star Wars but with a samurai twist at the back. Now there's an article....lol

    ReplyDelete
  6. I also get called an ape and I'm white as flour. Shouldn't a grown man be just a little bit tougher than this, even if he is a bum sniffer ballet player?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can't see any difference between a black person being called ape and a white one? How do you get through life?

      Delete
    2. Mark, super obnoxious. Isn't rhetoric best used for clear answers rather than implying someone is stupid? If you were a bit more vulgar you'd clearly show this chat group that you can hate just as much as the next racist ... hate people for having a different point of view. I'll bet Flying Tiger, a person I don't know, gets through life just fine. I congratulate him for expressing his voice and his rough way of making a joke.

      Delete
  7. Funny, incisive and accurate. Very pleased I was directed to this blog.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Crystal clear thinking in an age overwhelmed by the products of a dumbed down system of education, in which the ability to think and reason logically is never taught, and which emphasises 'feeling' overwhelmingly.

    ReplyDelete
  9. You have certainly hit the nail on the head with this article,Dallas. Ever since this incident, every time I see Adam Goodes on tv I switch it to something else. He could ahve stopped the incident from escalating but chose not to. It says more about him than that child.

    Also, making him Australian of the Year is an insult to the many thousands of people who contribute silently to the good of the nation. He is just a constant reminder to those of us who want better for aboriginal people just how hard that is becoming because of people like this man.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Congatulations Adam Goodes, you have ensured that racism is perputated for a good while longer. By adopting the role of the "victim" you have perpetuated the perception that you are weak and in need of protection. Not only that you need protection from a 13 year old girl! How weak is that? Since you are perceived as an icon for the Aboriginal community that weakness has now been spread to the whole community and you have reinforced the view that Aboriginals are weak and in need of protection from the "white" community. Racism is perpetuated. Well done.

    Here is some advice for you. If you have a problem with what the crowd is yelling during a football match, then maybe you should take up a profession that is not a spectator sport.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep. It's an absolute disgrace. I don't know how he can justify it to himself.

      Delete
    2. All I got from your response was "I'm racist but I don't want to state it openly so I'll deflect and call someone else racist for calling out racism. That'll confuse them and everyone will think I'm right and also very clever."
      Nailed it.

      Delete
  11. Adam is just a 'pet' for the media. Do we really need an Australian of the year?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, when Australian of the year was announced I was expecting someone that had earned it to be named. When I heard Adams name my jaw hit the ground

      Delete
  12. Thank you for being a voice of reason. Political correctness has gone too far. Next thing we know she'll be prosecuted under 18C, which our government have now shamefully back flipped on rescinding.

    ReplyDelete
  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Brilliant.....Everyone should read this.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I live a very isolated life. My father worked in the N.T. and the Kimberleys in the late 40's. I grew up on the Brisbane near south and near north coasts, then in Brisbane itself. The term my father used to refer to aborigines was "abos" and it seemed the generally used term. In polite conversation, Dad would say "natives." The most abusive term I heard (never from my father) was "boong." I think I probably first heard that in high school in Brisbane. In my later teens I first heard the term "rock apes" but it was an extremely rare usage. I don't know whether this will make sense to you, but it seemed as though the person who came up with that one - and the few people who used it - were straining to be offensive, whereas "boong" was a more relaxed and natural usage indicating contempt. Do you know what I mean?

    In all of this, I never heard the word "nigger" applied to Australians, but as I said, I have lead a very sheltered life. Have you had the word "nigger" applied to you, or heard it being applied to others?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, I grew up in Queensland. I was in a Boys Home (for naughty boys) for several years - a good half the kids there were Aboriginal.
      To get into the "cool gang" I had to become "blood brother" with an aboriginal boy (yes, real blood, with a real knife).
      I worked in the Pilbara and roamed around the Kimberlys in the 70's.

      Never heard an aboriginal called an "ape". Ever.

      The problem with this PC race stuff, is you have to "learn" about things that a fair-minded person would never think of.
      And then you have to decide if the person you are talking to might be a member of group that might be offended (not easy y'know - I know a lot of Welshmen who are blacker than Goodesy), then you have to VERY careful about what you say to that person.

      That's why sensible blokes will only hang-out and relax with people they know are part of "their" group. Everyone else is "on the outer".
      And I think that's what the PC brigade want. Divide and Conquer.

      Delete
    2. Robert I have spent the last 40 plus years in the Kimberley,married an aboriginal man and have 28 aboriginal descendants. I also have never heard the word ape used in that context. I did wonder if perhaps it was my age, that it was a recent occurrence, so I asked my adult grandchildren. But no, they had never heard it either, but two of the girls said that he looked like an ape. So, that's coming from aboriginal girls,so I'm not surprised a young white girl saw him as that. It was simply a description of his appearance.

      Delete
    3. netspace - I've been called nigger, but it's not the most popular one 'round these parts - 'Coon' or 'black c***' mostly. I don't see 'Abo' as a slur necessarily, I'm a lazy talker myself and its all about context for me with that one, I'm known to shorten words all the time, most of my family are guilty of the same - with blackfella too, its a really well used term among all of us.
      My best mate, who I've known since early teens calls me 'Boong'. I've had to defend him in a few bars over the years with that one (doesn't help that he'd shout me a round saying "hey Boong, what are ya drinking - leaded or unleaded?") but people don't understand that he's not being a racist, just sharing an inside joke. He's a truckie and years ago I was in the cab with him when we were hit from behind by another truck - the noise was like nothing else, my best mate describing it as a 'booooong' sound. And from there, it took on a life of its own. The fuel references were how we saw our drinks - unleaded was beer, leaded was scotch - the only two things we drank.
      I think if the PC brigade spent a week with me, they'd suffocate from over gasping, but you know, I'm happy and I like to laugh. We should all do it more and take ourselves a bit less seriously.

      Delete
    4. Thanks to all for your responses.

      BST, I had forgotten about "coon," which I took to be a US import of relatively recent (in my terms) origin. It got me thinking about Coon cheese though. Apparently, it is named after the inventor of the process for rapid curing of the cheese; Edward Coon, from a family of butter and cheese merchants in Philadelphia. The process was brought to Australia by Fred Walker.

      Nothing remarkable here, folks.

      The sting in this tale's tail involves our own Stephen Hagan, who does not believe the cheesy story.

      http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/nationalinterest/the-racist-name-blame-game/3173504

      The things you find!

      Shortening words is endemic to Australian English. "Aborigine" never stood a chance. I've always favoured "blackfella," which rolls off the tongue nicely, so I'm pleased to hear it's kosher at your place. You can guarantee someone will get into a dudgeon about it, though.

      Delete
  16. Bloody ripper article cheers mate..

    ReplyDelete
  17. An excellent commentary on what actually happened. Goodes is a great footballer but simply not that smart. I note he is right into the racism cause now. I wonder at how a person of mixed race can only identify with one component of his race. Does his black heritage override his white heritage. As Andrew Bolt found out it is illegal under 18C to even discuss this issue and expose those with less than honest intent. I like all races - its just the nutters in every race I struggle with.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Just discovered your excellent blog. How refreshing it is to find an Australian who is black that is able to see the curse of political correctness for the corrosive, divisive bulls**t that it is, and for those who indulge it, whether black or white, as opportunistic precious ar*eholes.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Dallas what a brilliant piece of writing. Inspirational in fact.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thank you for saying this Dallas. It is what a great deal of people think, and talk about privately, but are too afraid to say publicly.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Outstanding empirical sharpness. On par with Bill Whittle, Dennis Prager, Thomas Sowell, Mark Steyn and Alphonso Rachel etc. Dallas Scott's level or rational adult thought should be available in schools, especially journalism schools. Sadly, it usually ain't. Sempre Fi, Mr Scott.

    ReplyDelete
  22. You Sir, are an absolute Champion. I hope your word travels far and that people of all skin colour follow suit. I am not racist and do not like to use any name for skin colour, but for the purpose of this brilliant piece of writing, I shall. I am "white" and can honestly say that there are very few "white" folk that I look up to. However, I look up to you Mr Steam Train. Thank you so much for your voice of reason, wisdom and incredible common sense.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thank you Mr Dallas. I have been thinking about this incident ever since it occurred and you have been able to articulate what I have wished to say. When I was the same age as this girl, I was confronted by an adult who should have known better. I was affected for the rest of my life. My hope is that Mr Goodes will apologise to this girl. It would take alot of courage to do something which could restore her faith in adults. They are meant to take care of the young and show them how to live well.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Wow, what an exquisite article. The worst thing for aboriginals is to perpetuate the victim mentality or succor support from white interest groups who think convincing aboriginals to be constantly offended by whites is a beneficial or healthy choice.
    I grew up in a small country town with a large aboriginal population. All us kids went to school together, played after school together, played footy and cricket together and when we turned 18 went to the pubs together. Sadly things seem to have gone backwards since then. Everyone has to be offended by something it seems and even when someone is having an honest joke someone else has to find racism. Collingwood's Harry O'Brien (Lamumba) deems jokes as casual racism by white people. People like Harry are the racist ones.
    As for Goodes, he's a disgrace and so are those who fanned his hurt. This was a 13 year old girl. Her mum who was also vilified and called a racist and a bogan is on a mental disability pension. No one apologised to her after vilifying her, especially not Goodes.
    The sad thing is that a watershed moment from the great Nicky Winnmar in a genuine stand against racism was overshadowed by a glory seeking ponce called Adam Goodes.
    Your article is possibly the most succinct and honest article I've ever read.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Dallas, you are one of the most admirable human beings I have come across. I would be proud to be regarded as your friend for your logic, reason and intelligence.
    My wife and I are both immigrants, but our mongrel children are all-Australian - and proud of it.
    As an aside, I think we have only ever come across three cases of genuine racism, but many cases of cultural ignorance, such as my wife being asked "Did it take you long to learn how to use a stove?"

    ReplyDelete
  26. Have been enjoying your blog for some time now. Love the voice of good, common-sense. Love your skillful writing (I'm an English teacher - I can get a bit pedantic!).

    ReplyDelete
  27. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Wow. Simply wow. Can I add anything to this? No, because you articulated everything that I think many people were thinking. Thank you for writing this. What a brilliant article.

    ReplyDelete
  29. How is a 13 year old girl calling him an ape racist? Please answer this one for me. The fact is he looks like an ape, this is simply a comparison facially we do with many people daily! It has nothing to do with his race. Sorry people, you are getting too sensitive. One further thing, this really sets back the cause for aboriginals and other races, it turns people against them. Nobody likes anything forced down ones throat. Want respect? Be a nice person, respect others and make it too hard for for one to hate. Calling others racist regularly means you are a racist yourself.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Oh... And thanks for a great article and furthermore other aboriginal people here raising great comments, please keep up he voice of reason, you deserve Australian of the year for this article, it would bring more people together than false victimisation and bullying. Nobody likes being told what to do, it is basically bullying, try compassion and reason rather than insulting people and getting along.

    ReplyDelete
  31. This article, along with most of this blog, should be compulsory reading for ALL Australians.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Compulsory reading on how not to act. Agreed.

      Delete
  32. Great article!
    I want to bring up a few things that annoy me.
    1) the Australian Government treats Aboriginal people differently (benefiting them), and most Aboriginals are fine with it, I've even seen this with relatives. This sort of makes the Government look like they are encouraging everyone to treat Aboriginal people differently, even the Aboriginal people themselves! And so i don't see black/white separation completely fading anytime soon.
    2) Adam Goodes looks like an ape regardless of his skin colour, and should've been more mature with the whole situation. He shouldn't take offence to the ape remark anyway because he wasn't even alive when Europeans compared Aboriginal people to apes.
    3) Aboriginal people are no different to the majority of Australia, they grew up the same, they live the same, they just happen to share a skin colour with the Aboriginal people of 200 odd years ago that were put through hell.

    We are not the same people who were involved in that horror, even the victims. We are all different people now, and so race shouldn't separate us anymore!
    I don't know...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 200 years ago? You do realise that children were forcibly being taken from their parents less than 50 years ago?

      Delete
    2. The stolen generations? It's been thoroughly disproved in the courts. As Andrew Bolt would challenge, name 10 of them.

      Delete
    3. 200 years ago? yeah, being compared to an ape ONLY if you're black is quite an old thing... I know the stolen generation still affects people today. Im saying we should recognise that we are all the same; noone is more apey than anyone else, we are all descendants of apes aren't we?

      Delete
  33. Very nice template, it is so fresh. I like it, too. ecommerce wordpress themes

    ReplyDelete
  34. Wow 100% agree with you and not one dissenting reply. Reminds one of Saddam Hussains Iraq or Kim Jong Ils North Korea. Even they didn't have 100% of the votes. Let's see if my bit is published

    ReplyDelete
  35. Disgraceful. You give Uncle Tom a good name

    ReplyDelete
  36. Mr. Steam Train, big respect to you, fella.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Good onya Mate, brilliantly thought out and written.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really? Well written and well thought out are not necessarily the same. Yes the English was good but the content was absolutely vitriolic crap. It was tall poppy syndrome from someone who is clearly focused on what he views as traditional Aboriginal beings. It was not only self serving jealousy but absolutely divisive within our communities. Such jealousy is a symptom of poverty. Just google the poverty cycle and you might get a clue? Our communities are poverty stricken in the worst way.

      Delete
  38. I'd like to first show exactly what Goodes said in the aftermath.

    "I just hope that people give the 13-year-old girl the same sort of support because she needs it, her family needs it, and the people around them need it," he said. "It's not a witch-hunt, I don't want people to go after this young girl. We've just got to help educate society better so it doesn't happen again. It's not her fault, she's 13, she's still so innocent, I don't put any blame on her."

    His comments were helpful, yours are shameful. "I've been racially vilified and I copped it on the chin so if it happens to you and you complain then you're just a whinger and a sook".
    Sound about right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed it does, Mark. Bolt probably can't believe his luck.

      Delete
    2. Hey listen mate, I guess it is ok to have a discussion about how people should behave in our society. But it isn't ok to tell people how they should think or feel. So just give it a rest. No one cares about you here, and your guilt holds no power over us, because we understand what you really want.

      Delete
    3. Mark, this smacks of your white liberal (small L) guilt. The fact is, Goodes cooled down and realised he'd overreached which started his back pedal. Too late. He detonated - and then halfway through the explosion tried to stop what he had started. I used to call my toddler daughter "monkey". It was because she used to climb out of her cot when she was supposed to be sleeping. I have probably called my brother "ape" as a kid because he was hairy. The point is, as this article so clearly illustrates, if you go looking for a problem, you'll find one.

      Delete

  39. To follow is part of Adam Goodes Australian of the Year acceptance speech ~ words and an ideology he chose to impart ~ words and an ideology that fly in the face of what is now happening.

    1: "There are always two ways we can look at a situation."

    2: "We can choose to get angry or not."

    3: "Or choose to be offended or not."

    4: "We are all equal and the same in so many ways."

    5: "My hope is that we as a nation can break down the silos between races, break down those stereotypes of minority populations, Indigenous population and all the other minority groups."

    Great words, great sentiment ~ unfortunately though it seems ~ not words Adam Goodes stands by ~ we all have choices in life ~ we all deal with adversity ~ we can choose to be strong, resilient and proud or choose to be the victim

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your logic is seriously flawed at the very end. Adam has always been strong. That is what you and your like object to. He has never been the victim. He chose to speak out and got vilified because he did. It really is quite simple. All it needs now is intelligence and empathy to accept it for what it is.

      Delete
    2. So fifi, what is "it"? A guy earning $600K per annum who is somehow picked on or disadvantaged? If he wants to be play the "victim" card, it's his personal choice and he should own it. Alternatively, why not celebrate all that Australia has done for him? If the objective is to "break down the silos between races" then don't focus on that which is divisive (such as hauling out a 13 year old child). It's pretty simple. Adam Goodes has the opportunity to be a fine role model for Aboriginal kids, but this requires him to adjust his mindset; to see the opportunity Australia offers everyone, regardless of their colour or race, and to positively encourage kids to believe in themselves and pursue their dreams. Surely this is where his focus (and all of our focus) needs to be.

      Delete
  40. Maaaate! I'm with you! Adam Goodes is not the voice of his people. He is a highly-paid athlete who lives in luxury in Sydney. For many years he has been living the high life with gorgeous alabaster women hanging off his arm. If that's suffering, hey! where do I sign? He has been called many things including but not limited to: champion, sook, inspirational, diva, superstar, role model, stager, precious, protected species, etc, etc. Suck it up, Adam! You're not a victim, you're a participant in this circus we call sport. To be called an ape is awful but we cannot protect sports men and women from bogans in the crowd; just ask the NZ cricket captain Sir Richard Hadley! Booing is in every sport in every country. Sledging, taunts and mind games are all part of it. You step out into the arena and you can expect anything. Sir Ian Botham was called a wanker and a pommie bastard by Aussie crowds but it bit us on the arse because it made him play better! To those of you who like to boo, I would like to quote Voltaire (sort of):

    I MAY NOT AGREE WITH THE REASON FOR YOUR BOOING BUT I WILL DEFEND TO THE DEATH YOUR RIGHT TO BOO! (well maybe not to the death)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey just maybe I will comply if I indeed had it within me. I simply dont unfortunately!

      Delete
    2. Brilliantly said Pugwash!

      Delete
  41. What a deluded bunch some Australians are. This political bullshit being thrusted into our game by Adam Goodes has done nothing to bring people together , and the way this leftist media is jumping on the bandwagon to further there superiors agenda is a disgrace. It's a sad day when we have government bodies and media outlets trying to dictate to the people what we should say and think. No ones denying the aboriginals plight in Australia's history , but why do people think Australia shall become a nation of self haters .

    ReplyDelete
  42. Hey I hope you feel really proud now with you self serving essay. You have successfully given the apologisst and rednecks a free pass to excuse racist behaviour. Good on ya, And it was all about you and your own feelings of trauma. You failed to recognise the ongoing trauma of your fellow brothers and sisters but you got your moment so good onya again. Hope you feel proud?

    ReplyDelete
  43. Brilliant piece, Dallas. Most Australians agree with you.

    ReplyDelete
  44. What a load of crap on this page....

    ReplyDelete
  45. Adam was racially vilified. Adam was a sook and bullied a thirteen year old girl. The next day he crossed the line with both feet by claiming she was the face of racism in Australia. How utterly outrageous. What terribly bullying behaviour this was. You can't be excused for being a bully by saying, I hope you don't feel bullied.
    In other parts of Adam's AOTY acceptance speech, he played the victim card and laid the blame at white man's feet. No living person in Australia had any responsibility for injustices done to aboriginal people's in the 19th and early 20th centuries. We shouldn't be made to feel guilty by this victim mentality. Further, none of us voted for Adam Goodes - Australian of the Year. And we certainly wouldn't have for his bullying behaviour.
    As a brand ambassador for the Recognise and reconciliation movements, adam has shown what reconciliation is not about. Whatever reconciliation entails in its totality, it must also include repentance an forgiveness. I think the Australian people are overwhelmingly repentant of all the injustices done many years ago, yet it seems to me that Adam is not very representative of forgiveness.

    ReplyDelete
  46. A couple of Dallas Scott's blogs that I found excellent reading and a few words of my own.

    Aussie humour is different, different to any other country's. We have a very dry style of humour shared with, and derived from, the British. In fact, our humour is so different that visiting dignitaries are actually "coached" to understand that our arse about backwards and dry style is not us being offensive or rude, that's just how we are.

    Sport, in general, has always had, and hopefully will continue to have, the added dimension of "mind games". Not only the physicality and mental concentration of playing the game but also the ability to get into your opposition's head and put them off their game, sledging! Personally, I love the idea of sledging. In fact, in my basketball heyday, it was my job to single out the opposition's best player and sledge, taunt, niggle, and generally annoy them to the point of frustration, forcing them off their game. I was never racist or homophobic in my actions, I certainly wasn't kind but that was my job, I enjoyed it, my teammates appreciated my efforts and I did it bloody well!

    Now, I think it's fair to say that, at some point, as a spectator, we've all yelled out a sledge to a player or players from our team's opposing side. I know I'm guilty of it. This, I feel, is where lines get blurred. Having been the instigator, and recipient, of sledging on the court, on the field, shit, even in the shed playing darts with mates, if you are in the game I'm all for it. If you are not in the game, then what gives you the right to taunt and sledge people?

    Now, I'll revert back to our humour to explain the last line above.

    I'm fat. I know I'm fat. I don't have any problem with being fat. If one of my friends (friends are payers in your game of life) said "get out the way you fat bastard!" I wouldn't, and couldn't, be offended by that. I would consider that a term of endearment from a mate and offer up a witty retort, probably involving some fruity language and a reference to their mother's prowess in the bedroom. However, if someone I didn't know (spectator in your game of life) said "get out the way you fat bastard!" I would most certainly take offense. Not because someone called me fat, no, because someone I don't know called me a bastard. In Australia we call our mates bastards and call our enemies mate!

    In short, I'm not going one way or the other with the Goodes thing, I'm sitting on the fence. I am, however, suggesting that if you are a spectator "in the game", whatever "the game" may be, that you keep your comments to yourself and treat people with the respect that you would like to be treated with. And, of course, if you are a player "in the game" then question your opposition about their parents, are they actually brother and sister? And throw in the odd comment about their unfaithful partner, you know I would!

    Oh, and if you don't like the way "the game" is played, remove yourself from the game or play a different game.

    http://theblacksteamtrain.blogspot.com.au/2015/07/the-wayland-smithers-school-of.html?m=1u

    ReplyDelete
  47. I think everyone of your moronic and fundamentally racist arguments are answered.
    gclub
    gclub casino online
    จีคลับ

    ReplyDelete
  48. Your blog is very useful for me,Thanks for your sharing.

    หนังใหม่

    ReplyDelete
  49. Win online games that do not disappoint.
    Gclub It is a way to open online gambling games that focus on joy and a way of making money. Our online casino games have created a delight through online. And each game that we are a provider can actually bet. Create gambling that can satisfy customers. With the type of online lotto games that are thrilling. Modern service is available to all users at all times. The game of online gambling games, our online casinos to make customers more risky. No matter how gambling online, you can gamble with us. Because online gaming sites have more than 100 kinds of games for you to enjoy. Gambling Games Online with us, users will have both money and joy. Do not miss out on all the online gambling games that can satisfy and give you more pleasure. If you are looking for online gambling games to make money, you have many options to gamble with our online casino games online. Gambling Games Online Winning Our Website With Many Promotions That Make Every Customer Worth The Money Gclub มือถือ

    ReplyDelete